Nature 45

Laura Louise (Sisher) Losh

February 28, 1926 ~ October 20, 2021 (age 95)

Obituary

Laura Louise Losh, age 95, passed away quietly at her residence in Piedmont, MO on Wednesday, October 20, 2021. Laura was born on February 28, 1926, to Laura Lorean (England) and Henry Fisher of St. Louis, MO.

Laura was born with a big personality, an ever-present smile, and an energetic spirit. This spirit would be a contributor to her surviving whooping cough and pneumonia in both lungs as a toddler. Laura was a scrappy little girl, growing up with two brothers and five boy cousins. Because she was the only girl, the adults of the family made sure the boys included her in their activities, climbing trees, jumping off rooftops, or whatever rough and tumble play they did, Laura was right in the middle of it. Growing up during the Depression, Laura learned how to be resourceful. She and her brothers would scour the neighborhood looking for tin foil wrappers, bottles, and metal they could collect in their wagon to sell to the local scrap yard. They would also take turns standing in the line for commodities. Laura’s mother took in laundry to clean to earn extra money. She helped her mother iron by standing on a stool so she could reach the ironing board.

The Fisher family was musical with several of them playing instruments and singing. Laura would sometimes be encouraged to sing at the neighborhood pub where her father played pinochle. He would sit her on the bar, and she would sing to the patrons. When she finished, the pub owner would reward her with a soda. Laura graduated the 8th grade and sang a solo at the ceremony. She started high school but only completed half the year. Her parents decided to divorce, and Laura’s mother left the family home. With her older brother already married and living in his own home, Laura ended her pursuit of a high school education to take care of the household while her father worked. She did, however, make sure that her brother Charlie completed his education through high school, even though he was only a year younger. The two often had fun together winning dance contests at the local teen dance hall. Both of Laura’s brothers were friends with a neighborhood boy named Sam Losh. One day a group of neighborhood kids went to the Mississippi River. The group included the Fisher kids and Sam. The teens started skipping rocks, and Sam’s rock ricocheted back and hit Laura in the mouth. Sam made several trips to visit Laura to apologize and check on her. As a result, the two started dating and fell in love.

Laura and Sam were married July 26, 1943, while he was home on a three-day pass before he shipped out with his army unit to fight in WWII for the next two years. While Sam was overseas, Laura worked at a munitions plant, volunteered at the local USO, and still maintained the household she shared with her father and younger brother. After Sam returned from the war, he and Laura settled down to begin their married life in St Louis, MO. They raised two daughters, Linda and Paula. Laura was a stay-at-home mom for several years until her daughters were in upper elementary school and junior high in the Ritenour School district in the Woodson Terrace suburbs. She went back to work as a waitress at an Italian restaurant, at banquets at Ramada Inn, and then later at the restaurant in Famous-Barr in Northwest Plaza. It was around this time that Laura decided to get her driver’s license. The teenage boys in the neighborhood would holler “Watch out! Mrs. Losh is driving!” and then they would jump behind the hedges as a joke. Several years later and growing tired of the city, Laura and Sam moved to Piedmont, in 1976. Laura retired from the workforce at this time. She and Sam became active members of their church and their community and made several close friends. Laura and Sam loved animals and Laura raised several chihuahuas and poodles throughout the years. The dogs were often spoiled with trips to the groomers from where they would return with bows on their ears and polish on their “toenails”. They also took in stray animals including a dog that had puppies under their porch, and a small kitten that was rescued from the snow.

Always the life of the party, Laura made sure all of her family’s birthdays, holidays, graduations, and weddings were celebrated with a family get-together that always included dessert. A big personality with a love of laughter, she had no problems asking hilarious questions and putting people on the spot, particularly, potential suitors of her daughters and granddaughters. Very social, she had no problem making conversation in any situation and coming away with a new friend in most of them. Even bigger than her personality was her heart. Not one family member or friend ever had to question whether or not they were loved. Laura told them often and made sure they knew through her actions. She loved having her family close by and some of the family’s best memories involve spending weekends with extended family members in the country. This started when her daughters were young and continued when they were grown with families of their own. Her grandchildren have fond memories of sleeping on a pallet on the floor, waking up to the smell of bacon frying and the sound of Laura humming or singing softly as she always did while she cooked or did housework. Laura loved so much that when dementia took away her language, the one full phrase that was left was “I love you”, which she repeated often.

Laura was very active in the First Baptist Church in Piedmont and took turns teaching lessons with the other women in her Sunday school class. She faithfully attended church services and enjoyed singing the hymns. When attending church in person became too difficult due to the onset of dementia, she continued to read her Bible daily until the dementia kept her from being able to do so, and then her family members would read to her. Her husband Sam prayed with her every night, and after he passed, her daughter continued this practice in his place. Her daughters lovingly took care of Laura in her later years, which allowed her to spend this time at home with her family members, still participating in all special family occasions.

In addition to her parents, she is preceded in death by her loving and devoted husband of seventy-six years; infant great-granddaughter, Emily Fay; brothers: Jennings (Dink) Fowlkes, Henry Fisher, Jr. at age 4, Charles Fisher; sisters: Irene Fowlkes, and Alberta Fisher.

Laura is survived by her children: Linda Losh of Piedmont, Paula Williams and husband Kenneth of Piedmont; grandchildren: Lori Prewitt and companion Tim Graham, Tracy Fay and husband Kent, Kara Kearby and husband Lance, Brad Williams and wife Jennifer, Jason Crosswhite and wife Julie; great-grandchildren: Brooke Umfleet and husband Chad, Kendall Fay and wife Katie, Issiah Williams, Kameron Fay, Ty Martin, Karson Fay, Lane Crosswhite, Tiffany Williams, and Jade Crosswhite; step-great-grandsons: James Kearby and Lance Kearby ; great-great grandchildren; Scottlyn Fay, Colt Umfleet, Casten Umfleet, and Kiptyn Fay.

Visitation was held at 1:00 pm, Sunday, October 24, 2021, at Ruegg Funeral Home, Piedmont Chapel. Funeral service followed at 2:00 pm, also in the Piedmont Chapel. Pastor Jim Stewart ministered to the family. Lori Prewitt gave a heartfelt eulogy. Karson Fay, Brad Williams, Ty Martin, Kameron Fay, Kendall Fay, Issiah Williams, Land Crosswhite, and Jason Crosswhite served as pallbearers. Burial was in Masonic cemetery. Online condolences can be made at www.rueggfuneralhomes.com

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Services

Visitation
Sunday
October 24, 2021

1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Ruegg Funeral Home-Piedmont
321 N. Main St
Piedmont, MO 63957

Funeral Service
Sunday
October 24, 2021

2:00 PM
Ruegg Funeral Home-Piedmont
321 N. Main St
Piedmont, MO 63957

Committal
Sunday
October 24, 2021

3:00 PM
Masonic cemetery
E. Fir St
Piedmont, MO 63957

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